Kidz Korner Round Up

Here is a round up of our recommended titles for the little tykes who love to immerse themselves in a great book!!!

Raymie Nightingale by Kate Di Camillo
This is a recommended title to the junior fiction fans, most suitable from ages 12+ Raymie Clarke has come to realize that everything, absolutely everything, depends on her. And she has a plan. If Raymie can win the Little Miss Central Florida Tire competition, then her father, who left town two days ago with a dental hygienist, will see Raymie’s picture in the paper and (maybe) come home. To win, not only does Raymie have to do good deeds and learn how to twirl a baton; she also has to contend with the wispy, frequently fainting Louisiana Elefante, who has a show-business background, and the fiery, stubborn Beverly Tapinski, who’s determined to sabotage the contest. But as the competition approaches, loneliness, loss, and unanswerable questions draw the three girls into an unlikely friendship — and challenge each of them to come to the rescue in unexpected ways. Special thanks to Walker Books Publishers for sending me a review copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Annie

Possum Magic by Mem Fox
Grandma Poss uses her best bush magic to make Hush invisible. But when Hush longs to be able to see herself again, the two possums must make their way across Australia to find the magic food that will make Hush visible once more. This is a timeless Australian classic.My favourite part of this book was how this fun creative story was able to just casually teach my child the names of Australia’s capital city’s and my next favourites being full of Australian animals and even introducing a few different foods that are unique to Australia. Amazing illustrations filled with very detailed drawings and a beautiful use of colour and shading techniques. Another great book for developing language and cognitive skills in children ages 3 and up.
-Crystal

Home in the Rain by Bob Graham
A beautiful tale of a child waiting and excited for her younger sibling to be born. The child wants to meet, play and get to know her sibling.. Waiting out a storm by the highway inspires a name for an unborn baby sister in a tender. The rain is pouring down in buckets, and Francie and her mom are on their way home from Grandma’s. As the little red car pulls into a picnic area to wait out the storm, the windows fog up, and Francie spells out Dad, Mom, and Francie with her finger. But the back window is waiting for another name, that of Francie’s soon-to-arrive baby sister. What should they call her? I recommend this to children in senior primary school. Special thanks to Walker Books Publishers for sending me a review copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Meredith

Imagine by John Lennon
Imagine all the people living life in peace.
You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one.
I hope some day you’ll join us, and the world will be as one.
This is a beautiful picture book that illustrates the classic by John Lennon “Imagine” as the lyrics take the page through art, it follows a piegon to demonstrate peace to help us enjoy our life, for peace to flourish and for everyone to treat all kindly, equally and fairly. It was really nice to read this – very refreshing, it also brought back wonderful memories of my late uncle who loved John Lennon and the Beatles. I recommend this to children and families – it’s a wonderful family read that everyone can enjoy. A beautiful message of peace. Special thanks to Allen & Unwin Publishers for sending me a review copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Annie

 

Princess Cora and The Crocodile – By Laura Amy Schlitz and illustrated by Brian Floca.
Princess Cora is sick of boring lessons. She’s sick of running in circles around the dungeon gym. She’s sick, sick, sick of taking three baths a day. And her parents won’t let her have a dog. But when she writes to her fairy godmother for help, she doesn’t expect that help to come in the form of a crocodile—a crocodile who does not behave properly. With perfectly paced dry comedy, children’s book luminaries Laura Amy Schlitz and Brian Floca send Princess Cora on a delightful outdoor adventure — climbing trees! getting dirty! having fun! — while her alter ego wreaks utter havoc inside the castle, obliging one pair of royal helicopter parents to reconsider their ways. This is a fairy godmother story with a twist. Cora is such a good little girl and does her best to do as her parents ask and deals with her upset well, even when frustrated she writes it down – Amazing right! But when her fairy godmother sends her the solution it’s in the form of a naughty crocodile so straight away I knew this story was going to be cheeky and funny. Without spoiling the ending I found this book to have the potential to start so many different conversations with kids well over the age of even a ten year old. It’s got everything from consequences for actions and how to maybe find a better solution than what the crocodile chose to deal with Cora’s helicopter parents and nanny. Another great book for developing language, cognitive skills and a great potential for discussions about behaviour, consequences and how to communicate – recommend for children ages 5 and up. Many thanks to Walker Books for supplying this book in exchange for my honest review.
-Crystal

Leaf by Sandra Diekmann
When a polar bear arrives unexpectedly in the woods, the animals fear and avoid him, suspecting him to be dangerous—and his habit of collecting leaves only adds to their distrust. Then one day, they watch as he attempts to fly over the water with wings made of colorful leaves, just trying to go home. Maybe he needs some help? The old saying of ‘Don’t judge a book by the cover’ holds true in beautifully drawn picture book. As well as the tale. Within ‘Leaf’ you learn that just because someone looks different from you that doesn’t mean that they are monsters. Special thanks to Allen & Unwin Publishers for sending me a review copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Meredith.

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Blog Tour: Take Three Girls by Cath Crowley, Simmone Howell and Fiona Wood

3 amazing women collaborate on 1 amazing book.. This is a must read for all teens!!! It’s the ultimate Aussie Contemporary YA of 2017!!!

Take Three Girls follows 3 students: Kate, a quiet boarder, making some risky choices to pursue the experimental music she loves. Clem, shrugging off her old swim team persona, exploring her first sexual relationship, and trying to keep her annoying twin, Iris, at arm’s length.  Ady, grappling with a chaotic family, and wondering who her real friends are, she’s not the confident A-lister she appears to be. When their private boarding school, St Hilda’s, establishes a Year 10 Wellness Program in response to the era of cyberbullying, the three girls are thrown together and an unlikely friendship is sparked. One thing they have in common, each is targeted by PSST, a site devoted to gossip and slander that must have a source within St Hilda’s.

Who can you trust when rumour is the new truth?

While I was reading this book, I couldn’t help but feel thankful that I’m not a 16 year old in today’s world.. This book covered many issues teens face in today’s world but one issue that resonated with me was the aspect of cyber bullying and social media trolling. When I was in high school, yes bullying existed in the school yard which was bad enough but that’s where it stayed – in the school yard. In today’s world it creeps into cyber space where it effects the home environment and it’s also immortalised. Even if you were to pack up and move away for a fresh start, cyberbullying can follow you.
I felt this book is relevant, important and sends positive messages to all teens through a raw and funny means of reading about deep themes that need to be discussed – effects of cyberbullying, the sense of identity, friendship and even feminism. I loved the format of the book as I was reading journals and a story narrative. The dialogue was intelligent and humorous and I loved the friendship between Kate, Clem and Ady and regardless of how diverse they were in social status, background or current issues, the wellness program brings them together and it was just great to read about.
  A great book… A fantastic collaboration of 3 female Australian authors.. I would have to say this is the ultimate Aussie YA Contemporary of 2017!!!
Special thanks to Pan Macmillan Publishers for inviting me to be part of this Blog Tour and for sending me an Advanced Review Copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Annie

One by Sarah Crossan

This is a must read for YA fans… I read this book in one sitting!!!

A moving and beautifully crafted story about identity, sisterhood and a love that ultimately asks one question: what does it mean to want and have a soulmate?

“One” is a story about Grace and Tippi, who are twins – conjoined twins and it follows their lives in high school as they have to decide whether or not to have the operation which will physical separate them.

I have always struggled to enjoy poetry but this book did the impossible. It made me love the poetry style with which this story is told. This story, and the poetry prose through which it was told, was a raw, personal story which had me feeling every emotion.

I loved this book and could not stop hugging this book after I finished the story.
-Amanda

 

My Side of the Diamond by Sally Gardner

Release Date: October 2017
Publisher: Allen and Unwin Publishers

An interesting book that I flew through in a matter of hours.

What starts off with character profiling and world building, I thought this would be a crime/thriller – a case of ‘who done it’? – however, it sends you on a rollercoaster ride to something completely different.

The book is told in various perspectives however it focuses on Jazmin Little who has been shunned ever since her best friend Becky disappeared – however, Becky didn’t just disappear – she jumped off a tall building and seemingly never reached the ground!!! Like she simply vanished into thin air!! Since Becky’s disappearance, the question remains – did Jazmin have something to do with her friend’s disappearance? Or was it more to do with Icarus? an infamous character you get to know as you read the book.

A short book approx. 215 pages, It had a futuristic Frankenstien vibe to this story. The characters’ voices were projected quite well throughout the story though some of the dialogue got a little annoying – I guess teenagers communicate a little differently these days. As the story goes on, I found myself turning the page wanting to know what happens next and where all of this “mess” was coming from. I can definitely see a sequel coming out of this one. I liked the plot and how we get to know each character by the page – the story isn’t an info dump, it progresses and the plot thickens at each turn. I recommend this to fans of YA Sci-Fi and Thrillers.

Special thanks to Allen dnd Unwin Publishers for sending me an Advanced Review Copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Annie

The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo

How would you react if your father asked you to become a ghost bride? Would you agree if it meant a future of prosperity

This would have to be listed as one of my favourite reads for 2017!!!

Though ruled by British overlords in Colonial Malaya, the Chinese Malayans hold ancient customs, values and superstitions close to heart. Set in the sleepy port town of Malacca, this takes us back to the 1880’s and follows the story of Li Lan, our female protagonist and the daughter of a genteel yet bankrupt family with few prospects. Li Lan receives an unusual proposal from a wealthy and influential family – the Lims – who propose she become a ghost bride for their late and only son who recently died under mysterious circumstances. An ancient custom, becoming a ghost bride was said to placate a restless spirit and guarantee prosperity for the bride – but what happens when this restless spirit starts to haunt the potential ghost bride? What happens when rather than following regular protocols to rid a restless spirit from the human world, Li Lan embarks on a journey that leads her to a peculiar supernatural cross over.

Exploring old Malayan folklore, superstitions and intertwining of Malaysian culture with true historical events – this haunting, dark yet fascinating tale kept me turning the page to the very end! I was captivated from the first chapter and I strongly recommend this to fans of Frances Watts’ “The Peony Lantern”

Many thanks to Allen and Unwin Publishers who gave a copy to me as a prize for a competition I won.

This is one great book!!!

-Annie

The Inaugural Meeting of the Fairvale Ladies Book Club by Sophie Green

As the founder of a major network of readers, I can say I can relate to this book. When living in a crazy world, going through hardships of your own, finding friendship with avid readers through a bond which is our love for reading truly is refreshing. Personally I’m more of a YA reader however I really enjoyed this book for adult readers given the themes covered in this book and the setting. It’s said to suit those who loved “The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul” and “The Thorn Birds.”

This book is set in the Northern Territory during the 1970’s at a time of calamity – Cyclone Tracy almost wiped Darwin off the map and telecommunications have yet to be revived. A bomb exploded outside of the Hilton Hotel in Sydney killing 3 people and Former Australian Prime Minister Sir Robert Menzies dies.

I refer to this book as historical fiction due to the accurate reference to special events that took place in the 70’s. I enjoyed the intricate breakdown of each character that helped us get to know the character: Sybil, Sallyanne, Rita, Kate and Della at my own pace. What also kept me hanging to the end was how each of these women have their own hardships and stories to tell yet in a story of pain, there is the story of hope when friendships are formed over their love of books.

Highly recommended to fans of adult fiction set in Australia – not necessarily for just women. May also be of interest to those who lived in the 70’s.

Special thanks to Hachette Publishers for sending me an Advanced Review Copy in exchange for my honest review.

The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson

Two boys.. Two secrets..

David Piper has always been an outsider. His parents think he’s gay. The school bully thinks he’s a freak. Only his two best friends know the real truth – David wants to be a girl. On the first day at his new school Leo Denton has one goal – to be invisible. Attracting the attention of the most beautiful girl in year eleven is definitely not part of that plan. When Leo stands up for David in a fight, an unlikely friendship forms. But things are about to get messy. Because at Eden Park School secrets have a funny habit of not staying secret for long

The writing style and characters in this book were both engaging. I found myself flying through the pages and getting lost in the story. It’s written in such a way that I deeply cared for many of the characters and cried a few times. The characters felt authentic and the story is full of heart.

Representation is important. I’m so happy to have read a book that is so rich and is a high quality YA novel.

-Amanda