Kidz Korner Round Up

Here is a round up of our recommended titles for the little tykes who love to immerse themselves in a great book!!!

Raymie Nightingale by Kate Di Camillo
This is a recommended title to the junior fiction fans, most suitable from ages 12+ Raymie Clarke has come to realize that everything, absolutely everything, depends on her. And she has a plan. If Raymie can win the Little Miss Central Florida Tire competition, then her father, who left town two days ago with a dental hygienist, will see Raymie’s picture in the paper and (maybe) come home. To win, not only does Raymie have to do good deeds and learn how to twirl a baton; she also has to contend with the wispy, frequently fainting Louisiana Elefante, who has a show-business background, and the fiery, stubborn Beverly Tapinski, who’s determined to sabotage the contest. But as the competition approaches, loneliness, loss, and unanswerable questions draw the three girls into an unlikely friendship — and challenge each of them to come to the rescue in unexpected ways. Special thanks to Walker Books Publishers for sending me a review copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Annie

Possum Magic by Mem Fox
Grandma Poss uses her best bush magic to make Hush invisible. But when Hush longs to be able to see herself again, the two possums must make their way across Australia to find the magic food that will make Hush visible once more. This is a timeless Australian classic.My favourite part of this book was how this fun creative story was able to just casually teach my child the names of Australia’s capital city’s and my next favourites being full of Australian animals and even introducing a few different foods that are unique to Australia. Amazing illustrations filled with very detailed drawings and a beautiful use of colour and shading techniques. Another great book for developing language and cognitive skills in children ages 3 and up.
-Crystal

Home in the Rain by Bob Graham
A beautiful tale of a child waiting and excited for her younger sibling to be born. The child wants to meet, play and get to know her sibling.. Waiting out a storm by the highway inspires a name for an unborn baby sister in a tender. The rain is pouring down in buckets, and Francie and her mom are on their way home from Grandma’s. As the little red car pulls into a picnic area to wait out the storm, the windows fog up, and Francie spells out Dad, Mom, and Francie with her finger. But the back window is waiting for another name, that of Francie’s soon-to-arrive baby sister. What should they call her? I recommend this to children in senior primary school. Special thanks to Walker Books Publishers for sending me a review copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Meredith

Imagine by John Lennon
Imagine all the people living life in peace.
You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one.
I hope some day you’ll join us, and the world will be as one.
This is a beautiful picture book that illustrates the classic by John Lennon “Imagine” as the lyrics take the page through art, it follows a piegon to demonstrate peace to help us enjoy our life, for peace to flourish and for everyone to treat all kindly, equally and fairly. It was really nice to read this – very refreshing, it also brought back wonderful memories of my late uncle who loved John Lennon and the Beatles. I recommend this to children and families – it’s a wonderful family read that everyone can enjoy. A beautiful message of peace. Special thanks to Allen & Unwin Publishers for sending me a review copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Annie

 

Princess Cora and The Crocodile – By Laura Amy Schlitz and illustrated by Brian Floca.
Princess Cora is sick of boring lessons. She’s sick of running in circles around the dungeon gym. She’s sick, sick, sick of taking three baths a day. And her parents won’t let her have a dog. But when she writes to her fairy godmother for help, she doesn’t expect that help to come in the form of a crocodile—a crocodile who does not behave properly. With perfectly paced dry comedy, children’s book luminaries Laura Amy Schlitz and Brian Floca send Princess Cora on a delightful outdoor adventure — climbing trees! getting dirty! having fun! — while her alter ego wreaks utter havoc inside the castle, obliging one pair of royal helicopter parents to reconsider their ways. This is a fairy godmother story with a twist. Cora is such a good little girl and does her best to do as her parents ask and deals with her upset well, even when frustrated she writes it down – Amazing right! But when her fairy godmother sends her the solution it’s in the form of a naughty crocodile so straight away I knew this story was going to be cheeky and funny. Without spoiling the ending I found this book to have the potential to start so many different conversations with kids well over the age of even a ten year old. It’s got everything from consequences for actions and how to maybe find a better solution than what the crocodile chose to deal with Cora’s helicopter parents and nanny. Another great book for developing language, cognitive skills and a great potential for discussions about behaviour, consequences and how to communicate – recommend for children ages 5 and up. Many thanks to Walker Books for supplying this book in exchange for my honest review.
-Crystal

Leaf by Sandra Diekmann
When a polar bear arrives unexpectedly in the woods, the animals fear and avoid him, suspecting him to be dangerous—and his habit of collecting leaves only adds to their distrust. Then one day, they watch as he attempts to fly over the water with wings made of colorful leaves, just trying to go home. Maybe he needs some help? The old saying of ‘Don’t judge a book by the cover’ holds true in beautifully drawn picture book. As well as the tale. Within ‘Leaf’ you learn that just because someone looks different from you that doesn’t mean that they are monsters. Special thanks to Allen & Unwin Publishers for sending me a review copy in exchange for my honest review.
-Meredith.

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