Small Spaces by Sarah Epstein

We don’t pick and choose what to be afraid of. Our fears pick us.

The mind twister of the year that deserves a 10/10!!

The story is told by Tash Carmody, a young girl who has been traumatised since she witnessed her gruesome imaginary friend Sparrow lure young Mallory Fisher away from a carnival when they were kids. Being 8 years old, Tash didn’t have a filter and simply told the truth – yet at the time nobody believed Tash, and was accused of making stories up simply for attention – after years of therapy, she has since come to accept that Sparrow wasn’t real – it was all in her head. Years later, Mallory Fisher is 15 years old and has never spoken about the week she went missing. Time passes and history seems to be repeating itself causing Tash to question whether she is in fact control of her own faculties. As disturbing memories resurface, Tash soon realises Mallory is the key to unlocking the truth about a dark secret connecting them and what happened that fateful day at the Carnival..

I was hooked on this from page one and the only reason it took a day or two to read it was due to my need to read it in daylight hours. This YA thriller kept me guessing right up to the very end. It sucked me in so deep that I was so determined for answers and all the way through I was even asking myself, did Tash just see Mallory wonder off from the carnival the day she disappeared or did Tash really see Mallory get abducted by someone she can only identify as her imaginary friend, Sparrow? Did the disappearance even happen or is this all in her head? Or is Tash somehow involved with historical events and it’s more sinister?

As I was reading along with this incredibly unreliable narrator, I found her struggle to piece together truths where her mind blurred lines between reality and fantasy messed with my head too!! I was developing all sorts of theories and at one stage, EVERYONE was a suspect! I was the quickest I have read a book in such a long time I was just determine to know what really happened – It’s one great book that is structured so well with a backstory that pieces history together as you carry on with present day events, a story that kept me hanging right to the end, awake at night and absolutely gob smacked in the end!!! This was a fantastic debut novel that I recommend to all who enjoy YA suspense, mystery and intrigue!!

Special thanks to Walker Books Publishers for sending me a review copy of this book and well done to debut author Sarah Epstein on writing such an epic thriller of a story!! KUDOS!!!
-Annie

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Whisper by Lynette Noni

“Lengard is a secret government facility for extraordinary people,” they told me.

“I believed them. That was my mistake… There isn’t anyone else in the world like me… I’m different. I’m an anomaly, I’m a monster…”

For two years, six months, fourteen days, eleven hours and sixteen minutes, Subject Six-Eight-Four a.k.a ‘Jane Doe’ has been locked away and experimented on, without uttering a single word…

Imagine if you had an ability (or curse) where every time you spoke, something bad happens? Meet Jane Doe.. she has been locked up in a secret security facility for about 2 years and hasn’t spoken a word at all.. Why is she there? What is this all about? What has she done?

What I found with this book and what I liked most was different it was from the author’s previous works – the author really set this book apart from the Medoran Chronicles as it’s really quite a unique concept. Even with a detailed beginning, I came to know the characters pretty quickly and modest plot development kept me turning the page. Although my head was filled with so many unanswered questions, I also enjoyed some nice surprises along the way!! It really does keep you guessing and that’s what I enjoyed about this book.

I would say if you enjoyed Shatter Me by Tahereh Mafi or Everlife by Gena Showalter, you may enjoy this one. Special thanks to Pantera Press for sending me a review copy of this book.

Keep an eye out at your local bookstores – this awesome book will be hitting the shelves very soon!!!
-Annie

Snow, Fire, Sword by Sophie Masson

An amazing YA urban fantasy that is set on the backdrop of mythological Indonesia!!! A race against time to the very heart of an explosive secret… the truth about Snow, Fire and Sword. Dewi has never ventured beyond her village in the highlands of Jayangan, where she lives a comfortable life with her father, the respected village healer. But one day while working in the rice fields, she stumbles across Adi, an apprentice sword-maker, alone and hiding from the bloodthirsty bandits who kidnapped his beloved master.

When Dewi’s father also goes missing, she seeks the advice of the powerful tiger-people who watch over her village, but even they can see only so far through the cloud of sorcery that hangs over the kingdom. They leave her with a cryptic message: she and Adi must discover the true meaning of Snow, Fire and Sword before they can find her father and the other missing elders and reveal the truth about the danger that threatens Jayangan.

I had such a personal connection to this book as it was the very first time I managed to find a YA urban fantasy that was set on the backdrop of mythological Indonesia!!! It was the first time I was able to share a book with my Mum as we were able to discuss all the West Javanese legends contained throughout this story. I loved this book so much, I really took my time to read it so I was able to saviour it for as long as I could. A lot of the terminology used, I was able to understand first go but I thought it was fantastic that a glossary was included at the end of this book for the non-Indonesian speaking readers. The story moved at a reasonably quick pace, it allowed me to picture a whole new world that was inspired by true Indonesian landscape – I was able to picture the characters and the traditional Indonesian attire they were wearing so clearly. I highly recommend this to those who enjoy urban fantasies with reference to cultural legends – please note I had to get this book via Print on Demand. I’m so grateful to have this book on my shelf as it was such an immersive read, it is definitely a favourite!!!

-Annie

Read3r’z Re-Vu celebrate multicultural diversity in books on Harmony Day: 21 March 2018

Multicultural diversity is one of the reasons why Australia is such a great country. Harmony Day is a celebration of our cultural diversity and belonging. Celebrated on 21 March, this occasion has been celebrated since 1999 and more than 70 000 events are held in workplaces, community groups, schools, childcare centres, churches and religious organisations as well as Government Departments. Given how culturally diverse Read3r’z Re-Vu is, this is one celebration we could not miss!!!

The theme colour for Harmony Day is orange as it represents social communication and meaningful conversations – the freedom of ideas and encouragement of mutual respect.

Some Facts as found from the organisers of Harmony Day
-Australia’s cultural diversity is one of our greatest strengths and it is the heart of who we are.
-Approx. 49% of Australians were born overseas or have at least one parent who was.
-Australians identify with over 300 ancestries
-85% of Australians agree multiculturalism is good for Australia and more than 70 indigenous languages are spoken in Australia.

As part of this special occasion, this specific blog post is celebrating the books that relate to, promote or represent cultural diversity. The following are books as recommended by Read3r’z Re-Vu and our friends in the wider literacy community.

Read3r’z Re-Vu Committee

NJ recommends Freedom Swimmer by Wai Chim
“A heart-rending story set in real-life dystopian history of China’s cultural revolution. A story of friendship, hope, and freedom… I have thoroughly enjoyed reading Freedom Swimmer, I was attracted to this book initially because there weren’t many books written in English on the cultural revolution in China. During the revolution period of 1962-1976 people living in China had to use ration tickets in exchange for food, clothing and furniture. This was a period where family members turned against each other, teachers and business owners publically whipped and shamed for being “exploitative”, and young students recruited to the Red Guard to spread the words of Mao Zedong (Chairman Mao). Mao Zedong’s words and ideology brainwashed and manipulated a generation of young men and women, putting them through unimaginable suffering, separating them from their families and “re-educating” their ideals; in short, robbing people of their freedom to choose and think for themselves.”

Meredith recommends Autoboyography by Christina Lauren
“Three years ago, Tanner Scott’s family relocated from California to Utah, a move that nudged the bisexual teen temporarily back into the closet. Now, with one semester of high school to go, and no obstacles between him and out-of-state college freedom, Tanner plans to coast through his remaining classes and clear out of Utah. I can’t believe that I just finished a book that took me on emotional roller coaster ride. It’s been well over a decade since that has happened. The tears are still coming. Throughout Autoboyography I was crying my eyes out, squealing with joy, felt like my heart is braking in two and slowly mending again…”

 

 

Crystal recommends Who’s Afraid? By Maria Lewis
“This Urban fantasy brings out a mix of Maori Culture and the supernatural. The protagonist is Tommi Grayson, a young Scottish woman living an ordinary life, who stumbles violently into her birthright as the world’s most powerful werewolf. Werewolves are one of my many favourite mythical creatures so it’s no wonder this book captivated me like it did. I couldn’t help but be amazed at how the author managed to blend in street art, music and the colourful parts of everyday life so effortlessly. Tommi isn’t your typical everyday woman & neither is her name, this book takes you on such a journey and I truly enjoyed how Tommi came across as such a feminine character and yet so powerfully adaptable. She has some sass about her but not the overwhelming kind which is why I found her to be such a loveable character & her hair being blue had me pausing while I resisted the urge to go out and buy some blue hair dye. Definitely a book for the girls with lots of shirtless male scenes and blushing moments.”

 

Read3r’z Re-Vu is a network of readers and host sessions once a month. A time where we take a couple of hours out of our busy schedules to get together and talk all things books!! Rather than a book, a theme is assigned to each session so we can endorse wide reading. It is a reason why our TBR has sky rocketed over the years. Within our network we have made many friends with other readers, bookish entrepreneurs, authors and bloggers who catch up with us at our sessions and are based around Australia!!! Here are some recommendations from the bloggers in our network of readers…

 

Tien of Tien’s Blurb recommends Laurinda by Alice Pung
“I loved Laurinda as it tells the story of Lucy Lam, daughter of Vietnamese immigrants who won a scholarship at a prestigious school for girls. It was absolutely intense as Lucy literally straddled East and West and had to basically adopt a double identity. Hiding the worst of each world from the other. On top of all of this, she has to navigate this new school in which she tried to cruise unnoticed but then discovered its sinister side. The author herself, Alice Pung, is a daughter of Vietnamese immigrants so those aspects of the book felt truly authentic to me. I also felt that the struggle between reconciling East and West to be very honest in this book and is something all us, immigrants, refugees, all had to struggle with on a day to day basis. I’d highly recommend this read to all and I am looking forward to its adaptation!!!”

                                  

 

 

 

 

 

Lyn of Storyline recommends the PsyChangeling series by Nailini Singh
‘This series is set in 2080 has the most wonderful descriptions of her characters diverse genetics and an ongoing warning of the dangers posed by those that seek ‘racial purity'”

And for the kids… Whoever You Are by Mem Fox
“Every day all over Australia, children are laughing and crying, playing and learning, eating and sleeping. They may not look the same or speak the same language, but inside, they are just like you. This story weaves its way across cultures and generations, celebrating the bond that unites us all.”

 

Both Verushka of Edit Everything and Sarah of The Adventures of Sacakat both recommend When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon.

“Seeing an Indian Girl on a cover, someone I could possibly identify with – yes, even though this is YA, it still means something to see myself (at that age) reflected on the cover of a book. Rishi might give me some reservatons but the cover and the book that revolves around an Indian girl, who is trying to forge her own path, is something I identified with.”
-Verushka

“This book game me a warm and fuzzy overload (and I mean that’s a good thing). There are bits of humour sprinkled throughout this awkwardly adorable love story about juggling parental expectations and following your dreams. I loved the positive examples of arranged marriage portrayed in the story.  Everything about this book was a breath of fresh air to me.”
-Sarah

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Creators of The YA Room, Melbourne Sarah and Alex both recommend When Michael Met Mina by Randa Abdel-Fattah and Between Us by Clare Atkins

“We chose ‘When Michael Met Mina’ by Randa Abdel-Fattah and ‘Between Us’ by Clare Atkins because they are both such sensational novels that are set in Australia and they’re equal parts gripping and realistic. It’s s interesting and so necessary to read #LoveOzYA novels with a diverse range of characters, especially protagonists who are minorities. These two novels absolutely blew us away and we need more books like this – books about Australia and for Australian Teens that show what is going on in our own country. We cant recommend these two novels enough!!”
-Sarah and Alex

Vlogger Maisie whose booktube channel can be found on Sleepy Wired Studios recommends Pilate’s Wife by Antoinette May and Emma Vol. 1 (Manga)
Pilate’s Wife: “I really enjoyed this book,  story about a daughter of privilege in the most powerful empire the world has ever known, Claudia has a unique and disturbing “gift”: her dreams have an uncanny way of coming true. As a rebellious child seated beside the tyrannical Roman Emperor Tiberius, she first spies the powerful gladiator who will ultimately be her one true passion. Yet it is the ambitious magistrate Pontius Pilate who intrigues the impressionable young woman she becomes, and Claudia finds her way into his arms by means of a mysterious ancient magic. Pilate is her grand destiny, leading her to Judaea and plunging her into a seething cauldron of open rebellion. But following her friend Miriam of Magdala’s confession of her ecstatic love for a charismatic religious radical, Claudia
begins to experience terrifying 
visions—horrific premonitions of war, injustice, untold devastation and damnation and the crucifixion of a divine martyr whom she must do everything in her power to save”


Emma Vol 1. (Manga): “This volume had a great introduction and the art is very cute as well. I also loved the character interactions. In Victorian England, a young girl named Emma is rescued from a life of destitution and raised to become a proper British maid. When she meets William, the eldest son of a wealthy family, their love seems destined. But in this world, even matters of the heart are ruled by class distinctions.”

 

 

 

Kelly of Diva Booknerd recommends Jasper Jones by Craig Silvey.
“This is a narrative that will resonate with Australian readers. A young part Indigenous boy is ostracised by the community of Corrigan, a predominately white town in the nineteen sixties. Jasper Jones is a harbinger of disorder, culpable for crime and leading their youth astray, his white father is an alcoholic who has abandoned his sixteen tear old son. Charlie is a Caucasian young man sharing experience, the town of Corrigan is fuelled by racial tension and exclusion during the Vietnam war era, experienced by Charlie’s best friend Jeffrey Lu and his family, having migrated by Vietnam. Rural Australia prejudice and bigotry is confronting, although Charlie’s white narrative tends to obscure the explicit nature for the adolescent audience. Indigenous Australians are often excluded from our discussions surrounding diversity in fiction and characters like Jasper Jones only further highlight the atrocities of colonisation and the continuing racism faced by our Indigenous population.”

 

Jessica, Emily & Amber aka The Book Bratz recommend American Panda by Gloria Chao

“The book we chose is American Panda by Gloria Chao! You get exposed to a lot of culture in this book. We learned a lot about Taiwanese/Chinese culture, marriage practices, and language in this book, and it was really refreshing to be exposed to something like that — because we think reading diversely and expanding your cultural knowledge and experience is something that should be important for everyone — and as Gloria Chao says in her author’s note, hopefully there will be more Chinese writers and storytellers coming forth in the future!”

 

 

Deanna of Deanna’s World recommends The Last King by Katee Robert.

Ultra wealthy and super powerful, the King family is like royalty in Texas. But who will keep the throne? (The Kings, Book 1)

“I liked the diversity in this book because the heroine was Indian and the author was not shy about talking about her heritage even giving her a obviously Indian name like Samara. Both her parents had very traditionally Indian names as well and she called her mother “amma” which I think is Indian for “mum”. You don’t see many Indian characters in books, so I was glad to see it in this one.”

 

 

Finally.. my own thoughts and recommendations…
I was born and raised in Australia. My mother is Indonesian from the Island of West Java which makes her Sundanese and my father is Australian of Irish ancestry. Growing up in a multicultural household can be challenging as one may feel trapped between two cultures but in all honesty, it is an amazing experience of having the best of both worlds. Having the ability to speak both languages (Indonesian with bits and pieces of the Sunda dialect and English) and getting in touch with both cultures is a wondrous experience a lot of us in Australia do take for granted. As an avid reader, one of my favourite themes is fantasy fiction, especially fantasy fiction stories that are inspired by culture – some may call it alternate history, some call it speculative fiction – I just call it awesome. There are a lot of books I have read over the years but just have a few recommendations here.

The first one I want to recommend is Snow, Fire, Sword by Sophie Masson. This was the first book I ever came across in my reading life that is derived from Indonesian culture and explores myths and legends that were told in my own family in West Java!!! This is a story that follows a perilous journey of a Kris (small dagger) apprentice and a Kampung (village) girl as they race against time to discover the heart of an ancient secret: the truth about Snow, Fire and Sword. Set on the backdrop of mythological Indonesia, the referencing to Indonesian culture, food, landscape – even language is so accurate, you can just imagine the fan-girling going on in my house as I was reading this book!!! A very special book as it was a book I was able to share with my Mum, we were forever talking about this book, going back to it and reading extracts that referenced legends.. This is definitely a collectable for me.

Throughout the blog, you would have seen quite a few recommendations. Most recently I read the final showdown of the Rebel of the Sands series by Alwyn Hamilton. This trilogy is inspired by the Arabian nights tales which are my absolute favourite – stories of the desert – a story with djinn.. swords.. sand.. amazing trilogy really worth investing in!!!

Taking it to contemporary YA now, there are a few books that have resonated with me: I Am Thunder by Muhammad Khan, Hate is such a Strong Word by Sarah Ayoub, and When Michael Met Mina by Randa-Abdel Fattah just to name a few that explore the struggle of cultural identity and our sense of belonging. One that resonated with me that explored Indigenous Australia was Nona and Me by Clare Atkins.

I would like to thank everyone who took part in this post, for being involved in Harmony Day – Read3r’z Re-Vu style and for your amazing recommendations and links to your fantastic blogs. Having beautiful people like you as part of the Read3r’z Re-Vu network makes it such an incredible experience!!!

Wishing you all a wonderful and happy Harmony Day!!
A day to celebrate culture and bringing everyone together..
For more information on Harmony Day, visit: http://www.harmony.gov.au/

Harmony Day special blog post compiled by Annie (Founder of Read3r’z Re-Vu)

Unearthed by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner with Exclusive Q&A

Publisher: Allen and Unwin

Unearthed book launch emceed by the amazing Garth Nix (right) as he cracks us all up with his “background research” on Meagan (left) and Amie (centre)

Unearthed
When Earth intercepts a message from a long-extinct alien race, it seems like the solution the planet has been waiting for. The Undying’s advanced technology has the potential to undo environmental damage and turn lives around, and Gaia, their former home planet, is a treasure trove waiting to be uncovered. For Jules Addison and his fellow scholars, the discovery of an alien culture offers unprecedented opportunity for study… as long as scavengers like Amelia Radcliffe don’t loot everything first. Mia and Jules’ different reasons for smuggling themselves onto Gaia put them immediately at odds, but after escaping a dangerous confrontation with other scavvers, they form a fragile alliance. In order to penetrate the Undying temple and reach the tech and information hidden within, the two must decode the ancient race’s secrets and survive their traps. But the more they learn about the Undying, the more their presence in the temple seems to be part of a grand design that could spell the end of the human race. (Goodreads)

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Our thoughts
This book is filled with nonstop action. It has the exciting adventure feel of Indiana Jones and Tomb Raider. The story follows a dynamic, loveable duo Mia and Jules on deciphering a secret message of the Undying whilst exploring an alien planet that the government is trying to profit from. This story is mostly about survival and explores themes of ethics, choices, trust and courage, I was immersed in the story from chapter 1. The fact that the story is set on another planet very similar to Earth makes the setting relatable whilst still managing to make the reader feel the “alien-ness” of the planet due to reminders about breathers. The cliffhanger of this book was absolutely crazy. I need book 2.
– NJ

This book really lived up to its pitch – an action packed novel that is like Indiana Jones meets Tomb Raider in Outer Space. Following the adventure of Amelia and Jules who meet by chance on another planet but have their own agendas when they team up. It was a lot of fun to read, non-stop action, plot twists and witty dialogue, all up it was entertaining, even for someone like me who isn’t all that into sci-fi stories set in space. Both authors did a fantastic job collaborating on this one!!!
-Annie

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Exclusive Q&A with Amie and Meagan!!!

How did you come up with the premise of “Unearthed”?
Back in January 2015, we were on tour together, and we were spending a rare afternoon off in our hotel room, pretty much collapsed. Tour is tiring! We found an Indiana Jones marathon on TV, and we both adore all things Indy, so that was our afternoon sorted. We’d been talking a lot about what we’d write next, and slowly, the idea of a tomb-raiding adventure (in space, of course) came together.

 I’m curious to know how two authors collaborate to write one book. Do you get together to come up with characters and ideas for the plot then something each to compare?
We work together at every stage – we brainstorm the setting and the start of the plot together, we figure out the characters that would fit into it best, and then we start fleshing out the character we’ll each write. Ideas get tossed back and forth and tweaked and improved so often that we usually have no idea who came up with what.

Author collaboration would be a rewarding experience but are there be any challenges in a collaboration? How did you overcome these challenges?
By far the hardest part is being in different timezones – we wish we could chat even more than we do! But we email constantly, we text every day, we often jump on video chat to brainstorm (and just have a chat, we’re friends as well as co-authors) and we come up with lots of ways to stay in touch.

If “Unearthed” was to become a film adaptation, would do you picture playing your main characters on screen?
We have our fingers crossed for this, because Sony and a production company called Cross Creek have actually got it in development! A fantastic director called Doug Liman (The Bourne Identity, The Edge of Tomorrow) is attached. We’re actually not supposed to talk about who we’d cast, because we don’t want to cloud the waters in case the characters are cast – you never know your luck!

For writers who are thinking of engaging in an author collaboration, what would be your best piece of advice you could give to them?
We’d advise them to communicate a lot, and check they’re both on the same page about everything they can think of, from how quickly they’ll work, to what they’ll do if one of them needs to take a break, to what they’ll do if they have different ideas about where they’ll take the story, and so on. It’s always easier to figure this stuff out in advance than later on, when it’s actually causing a problem. We’ve been friends for so long, and writing together for so long, that we know each other inside out, and it makes a huge difference!

-NJ & Annie

The Harper Effect by Taryn Bashford – Summer Reading Blog Tour

Firstly I would like to give my special thanks to Pan Macmillan Publishers for selecting me to be part of this Summer Reading Blog Tour and for sending me an Advanced Review Copy of this book.

Sadly, when I came on board, my excitement was rattled as a controversial issue came to light regarding the author of this book. Whilst I do not support any level of bad form anywhere, in any community, I would like to state my posting here does not endorse or reject the issue that came to light. As I was not directly involved in the incident that occurred, I cannot make comment on the matter other than I sincerely hope both parties are able to reach a mutual resolution amicably and I send my best to both of them.

The Harper Effect
I am a fan of the Young Adult genre and as an adult reading this book, I didn’t mind the story line as it was interesting to experience the life of a young tennis player who was dumped by her coach and is trying to deal with this and life in general. I agree, the character can be unlikeable with such problematic behaviour demonstrated throughout the book. However, the way I saw this character, it felt like reading about child stars. It doesn’t excuse the behaviour but it could explain it to a degree. Some say child stars who engage in reprehensible behaviour aren’t always held accountable as they may not have the maturity or capacity to understand or self-reflect due to the pressure to be perfection. Personally, I can see the book going 2 ways. I can see a contemporary young adult reader enjoy the story, especially with the sporty/tennis elements illustrated throughout the book that you would not often see and I can also see the reader having issue with the character herself.

As far as a recommendation goes – I would recommend anyone who has heard about this book simply to read it for themselves to form their own opinion on the book as I normally do with books I hear about.
-Annie

Q&A with author, Taryn Bashford on 23 December 2017 as part of the Summer Reading Blog Tour

 Is “The Harper Effect” is this your debut novel? Tell us what you have written/published to date.
Yes, The Harper Effect is my debut novel. That’s not to say there aren’t a fair few unpublished ones keeping each other company in a trunk in the attic!

What was your inspiration to write “The Harper Effect” and how did you come up with the characters in your story?
The Harper Effect has been through quite a transformation because it began as a middle grade novel when I first wrote it at the age of 14. At the time, my brother was entering the professional tennis world, while I was training for the Olympics track events. Sport was and still is a big part of my life, so it was only natural that ‘GAME FACE’ as it was once called, was pulled out of said trunk. I already had Aria and Harper in the original story, although back then they were twins! The feedback I got from publishers was that the market was over twins, and so they became sisters instead. I added Jacob and Colt because having read about a hundred YA novels by that stage, I knew I needed a love interest, and a bit of guy conflict is always good. They both came to me quickly and strongly, and sort of wrote themselves into the story.

There appears to be a tennis theme in “The Harper Effect” I am wondering if you a sports fan or player yourself? Is tennis your favourite sport?
My brother is the tennis nut. He played professionally and then became a coach, working with amazing players like Amelie Mauresmo, Michael Chang and Marcos Baghdatis. As an adult I’m very interested in exploring teens who surpass the norm – not just in sport but in any aspect of life. I’m keen to explore what it takes, why they are able to achieve such amazing things, and then to also reveal that they still have flaws, like any average person. I think that makes them more real, and it makes teens wanting to achieve great things feel like it’s a possibility – that anyone can achieve their dreams.

As you were writing this story, what was the best piece of advice you were given that you would pass on to aspiring writers?
To write every day. Even if it’s just for an hour. It keeps you connected to the story and the characters, and it helps you stay in control of all the threads that you’re weaving. I also find that it’s easier to stay immersed in the story world, and that means it becomes so real to you that the characters begin to tell you what story to write.

If you had to choose winter by the fireplace or summer by the beach to read your favourite book, where would you choose?
Definitely winter by the fireplace. When I’m at the beach I like to swim and rock climb and hunt for crabs.

Where is your favourite place to eat?
Italy!

Do you have any book signing tour plans or scheduled appearances in Australia?
I have an exciting event planned for the 18th January at Annie’s Books in Peregian Beach, QLD. As I’m promoting #GirlsInSport, I have a panel of elite athletes coming to the book launch to reveal how they got into the sport they love and what it takes to reach the levels they have. The panel includes Queensland’s 18 & Under Captain and one of our sprint hopefuls who’s been selected for the Commonwealth Games nomination event. I hope that The Harper Effect will provide sporty and confident role models for our teens, and I hope that the story inspires girls to stay in sport and to dream big.

How can readers get connected with you?
I think I’ve covered most bases with this list 😊
Website: www.tarynbashford.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TarynBashford
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009813250572
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tarynbashford/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32941900-the-harper-effect
Book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vs7zV9t8YPY

Thankyou 2017… That’s a Wrap!!!

As I am sitting here writing this 2017 wrap up, I am wondering – where did the year go!?
2017 was once again, a great success for Read3r’z Re-Vu and in 2018, we will be entering our 9th year!!! Next to getting our hands on some fantastic reads this year, a most honourable achievement is how much we have grown as a network. Read3r’z Re-Vu continue to network with authors, publishers and reading enthusiasts who become such great friends and it’s amazing to see the growth and the friendships formed over a common bond – the passion for reading. It’s been so much fun at our monthly sessions hanging out with well read friends and getting to know authors and their writing journeys. Attending bookish events and book launches throughout the year was also a highlight.

Many thanks goes to the authors who spent their time with us this year by attending our sessions and exclusive events as special guests. It gave members such a unique and memorable experience. Many thanks to Krystal Sutherland (author of “Our Chemical Hearts” and A Semi Definitive List of Worst Nightmares”) who was the first author to join us this year as she joined us as special guest for our March session and who also had me emcee her book launch for “A Semi Definitive List of Worst Nightmares” at Kinokuniya Bookstore.

Many thanks also to E.R Murray (author of “Caramel Hearts”) who, whilst visiting Australia all the way from Ireland, had a special lunch with us at Volcanos Steakhouse. It was amazing to learn all about your writing journey and life in Ireland.

To author Garth Nix, (author of newly released “Frogkisser!” thank you for joining our Read3r’z Re-Vu special: Author in Focus session at Galaxy Bookshop. We had so much fun with you that day, thanks so much for the Haigh’s Chocolate Frogs and for giving away Frogkisser! audio books and an advance review copy of “Have Sword, Will Travel

Lynette Noni, (author of “The Medoran Series“) thank you so much for spending time with us over high tea while you were in Sydney during the Sydney Writers Festival. We had such a great time chatting over tea and cakes with you!!

To Wai Chim (author of “Freedom Swimmer”) thank you so much for joining us for our July session, it was so insightful learning about your inspiration to write Freedom Swimmer.

James Bradley (author of “The Silent Invasion”) thankyou to you also for joining us as special guest at our September session, it was great to chat all things books with you!!!. Many thanks also goes to author Brittany Riley, author of (“Enchantment”) who also joined our September session as an attendee. To Gabrielle Williams (author of “My Life as a Hashtag”) lunch with you at the New York Metro was amazing, thank you so much for joining us while you were visiting Sydney from Melbourne.

To Marita Smith (author of “Convergence”) and the wonderful Harbour Publishing House team who visited Read3r’z Re-Vu over afternoon tea at The Coffee Club all the way from Ulladulla – thankyou also Marita for the homemade cookies!!

 Special shout out goes to our creative partner – The Curio Boutique, created and owned by the ever so talented NJ!!! Thank you so much for partnering with Read3r’z Re-Vu and sponsoring prizes from The Curio Boutique for our session giveaways. We are so honoured to be such great friends with you and we are so proud of your creativity and talents!!! Also, big congrats to you for hosting your very first stall this year at the Allen and Unwin YA Fest!! It was very exciting to be there to support you and we hope to see you running more stalls in the future and really look forward to your 2018 creations.

To all the publishers who take a chance on us to consider, read and review their books as well as help organise for the authors to attend our sessions, thank you so very much!!! It’s great to be affiliated with great Australian Publishers and we really look forward to continue working with you in the New Year.

Read3r’z Re-Vu Members – session attendees, online members and blog followers, thank you so much for always engaging with us and for your enthusiasm that keeps this network alive!! 2017 was a great year for books and here is a list of titles some of our session members have noted to be their 2017 book of the year…

NJ: “The Hate U Give” by Angie Thomas and “Strange the Dreamer” by Laini Taylor
Meredith: “Autoboyography” by Christina Lauren
Lyn: “Slaughterhouse-Five” by Kurt Vonnegut
Monica: “Cinder” by Marissa Meyer and “Bitter Greens” by Kate Forysth
Allison: “The Hidden Legacy Series” by Ilona Andrews
Rebecca: “Keys of the Kingdom” series by Garth Nix and “The Silent Invasion” by James Bradley
Sarah: “Demian” by Hermann Hesse

As for me.. like everyone else.. it really is a tough choice!!! Nevermoor” by Jessica Townsend was such a great read.. so was “Wreck” by Fleur Ferris, “All Rights Reserved” by Gregory Scott Katsoulis, “The Crown’s Fate” by Evelyn Skye.. “Flying Through Clouds” by Michelle Morgan had a very personal connection for me.. Just some of the great titles I had the pleasure of reading this year and I am psyched for the 2018 new releases!!!

From the bottom of my heart, I want to send you all much love and many thanks to you all for making Read3r’z Re-Vu, the 2017 season such a great success!!! Wishing you all the very best for the festive season and many happy returns for a happy new year!!!

Well, 2017… that’s a wrap!!!
-Annie
xoxoxoxo
(Founder)

new year – new books – more for our TBR!!!

featured image: Pintrest