Because you Love to Hate Me: 13 Tales of Villainy Edited by Ameriie

An awesomely unique compilation of 13 short stories written by brilliant authors from around the world and collaborated with influential booktubers.

I say this is unique as these short stories are from the perspective of misunderstood villains and are written by fantastic authors as challenged by influential booktubers. What I enjoyed most about this book was the short stories that were entertaining as well as the short pieces written by the book tubers when they challenged the authors to write a short story on various themes. The pieces were that good, I can see these booktubers publishing their own books one day. This was one anthology I struggled to pin point a favourite as they were all pretty good, I also found it interesting to see a villain’s perspective as it gives you an idea as to why they were ‘tipped over the edge’ and moved over to the dark side. I would highly recommend this to fans of YA or if any of the noted authors are your ‘autobuy’ author, they wont disappoint in this fabulous compilation. Once again, I didn’t read this from beginning to end – I bounced around various authors starting with my favourites (lol). It’s quite different and a lot of fun to read!!

Edited by international popstar, now writer, Ameriie, the authors who teamed up for this compilation feature: Renee Ahdieh, Soman Chainani, Susan Dennard, Sarah Enni, Marissa Meyer, Cindy Pon, Victoria Schwab, Samantha Shannon, Adam Silvera, Andrew Smith, April Genevieve Tucholke, and Nicola Yoon. The Booktubers: Benjamin Alderson (Benjaminoftomes), Sasha Alsberg (abookutopia), Whitney Atkinson (WhittyNovels), Tina Burke (ChristinaReadsYA blog and TheLushables), Catriona Feeney (LittleBookOwl), Jesse George (JessetheReader), Zo Herdt (readbyzoe), Samantha Lane (Thoughts on Tomes), Sophia Lee (thebookbasement), Raeleen Lemay (padfootandprongs07), Regan Perusse (PeruseProject), Christine Riccio (polandbananasBOOKS), and Steph Sinclair & Kat Kennedy (Cuddlebuggery blog and channel).

Special thanks to Bloomsbury Publishers for sending me a review copy in exchange for my honest review.

-Annie

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Fight Like a Girl by Clementine Ford

Online sensation, fearless feminist heroine and scourge of trolls and misogynists everywhere, Clementine Ford is a beacon of hope and inspiration to thousands of Australian women and girls. Her incendiary debut Fight Like A Girl is an essential manifesto for feminists new, old and soon-to-be, and exposes just how unequal the world continues to be for women. Crucially, it is a call to arms for all women to rediscover the fury that has been suppressed by a society that still considers feminism a threat. Personal and fearless – a call to arms for feminists new, old and as yet unrealised by one of our most outspoken feminist writers.

This book is empowering, educational, inspiring, thought-provoking and a million other things.

I learnt a lot of things while reading this book, but perhaps the most impactful for me was that it is ok to be angry. Having been raised in a society where girls are told that being angry is not lady like, unbecoming and rude, it was empowering to be told it’s ok to be angry. As Clementine Ford outlines, how could we not be angry – if you’re not angry you’re not paying attention.

I encourage everyone to read this book. Learn more about the need for feminism. Get angry, start more discussions, fight for change. Raise voices, raise courage, raise the flag.
-Amanda

Begin. End. Begin: A #LoveOzYA Anthology edited by Danielle Binks

Captivating, Diverse, Thoughtful and Witty!
This is the YA Event of 2017!!!

           Instagram: read3rz_revu

The authors who contributed to this great YA anthology:
Amie Kaufman, Will Kostakis, Alice Pung, Michael Pryor, Melissa Keil, Ellie Marney, Lili Wilkinson, Gabrielle Tozer, Danielle Binks and Jaclyn Moriarty.

My immediate thought after reading the anthology is that it’s possibly the most diverse anthology ever compiled. Well done Danielle Binks and the authors! This book is unmistakably Aussie, it contains captivating short stories that make your heart melt. This anthology does not shy away from real topics, it’s loads of fun to read and each story has a unique premise. Themes explored includes love, acceptance, family, politics and coming of age. This anthology covers all the glory of coming of age angst set in interesting settings like bus rides, space, Mars, time travel booths and even tunnels! I particularly enjoyed the relatable and concrete characters. You will find that some of the stories are written with the dry Aussie humour and wit, and some written with great thoughtfulness and consideration. I would love to see the stories become actual novels. This is a great read to get your hands on, it attests to why we love OZ YA novels! Each short story holds its own, with compelling writing and fantastic characters, it’s no doubt a great anthology.
– NJ

This YA Anthology is a brilliant compilation of short stories written by fantastic Aussie YA authors that make you laugh, cry, cringe even ponder on some of the issues that are raised each story. To be honest, it really is difficult to choose a favourite as every story was fantastic in its own way – from the writing style, witty dialogue to even the plot or diverse themes represented. As this was an anthology, I decided to be different and not read this in chronological order. I read each story randomly and “tabbed off” each story until I finished (pictured below). I really enjoyed it as I would reward myself each night with a short story after work. It was easy to immerse myself in each one and also got closure at the end of each short story. Some stories I refused to read at night time (lol) some I could related to the character either due to personality or cultural background. This YA Anthology was such a great idea!! I really did love how unique and diverse the stories are and I highly recommend this to all YA fans.
-Annie

   this is how I ‘tabbed off’ each story

Many thanks to Harper Collins Publishers for sending us a review copies in exchange for our honest reviews.

#LoveOzYA

Anne Boleyn: A King’s Obsession (Six Tudor Queens) by Alison Weir

An intense, refreshing and intriguing account of life as Anne Boleyn

Expected publication: 18 May 2017

Anne Boleyn: A King’s Obsession takes on a new intense, sympathetic perspective on Anne Boleyn’s life. In particular, the author explored a refreshing feminist perspective where Anne was a heroine in her own right – using her powers to influence social policies of the day and using her charm and wit to gain the favour of Henry VIII. What I enjoyed most about this novel is that whilst the story is overall sympathetic to Anne Boleyn, it was told in a believable way. The author added layers to her personality by showing that Anne Boleyn was an imperfect, ambitious woman who is also fragile and insecure throughout her life as mistress and then Queen of Henry VIII. This book chronologically accounts Anne Boleyn’s life from the glamorous French Court where she served as lady in waiting, to her time in the English Court where she ensnared the lust and obsession of Henry VIII. It accounts all her struggles against Queen Katherine (Henry VIII’s first wife) and daughter Mary, the harrowing path to become the new but much hated Queen of England and ending with her well-known downfall. Overall, it’s a long but intriguing read about what life would have been like as Anne Boleyn who was portrayed as a progressive and spirited woman. A woman who had to choose between love and power, faith and desire, passion and duty. There was substantial research done by the author to make this book an authentic read. I recommend this book for historical fiction lovers!

– NJ

Vigilante by Kady Cross

Intense, confronting, a page-turner!

Vigilante is a story about girl power or to put it more accurately, it’s about empowering females. It’s an action-packed, easy to read and unputdownable read. The story can be quite confronting and disturbing as it involved detailed sexual assault and dealing with suicide. Our protagonist, Hadley is like any normal high school girl looking forward to senior year but when her best friend Magda committed suicide after being raped by multiple boys at a party, Hadley was distraught by the gravity of what happened. Since the legal system was unable to deliver the appropriate justice against Magda’s attackers, Hadley decided to dish out her own brand of justice on each of Magda’s attackers, she began masking herself as the anonymous Pink Vigilante. Vigilante promotes self-protection and defense against sexual assault. At a deeper level, Vigilante warns of the consequences of taking justice into your own hands. The story touches upon the use of social media for bullying, illustrates the power of women when they support one another, and advocates the importance of correcting societal biases and assumptions against women. I recommend this book for those who wants to read about girl power, “victor not victim” storyline and for those who enjoys a good revenge story. It is a satisfying story as the villains definitely got what they deserved. After reading this book, I was seriously considering taking self-defence classes!

 

– NJ

One Half from the East by Nadia Hashimi

“It is not the voice of a girl dressed as a boy. It is even stronger. Invincible.”

One Half from the East is a great YA read that I would highly recommend for readers who enjoys a coming-of-age, slice of life story. It’s a story about a young girl who had to pretend to be a boy in order to change the fortune of her family. This superficial transformation is based on a longstanding Afghan belief that a “bacha posh” (girl who dresses and acts like a boy at home and in public) can bring luck to her family. This story is an interesting exploration of how boys and girls are treated differently in traditional Afghanistan, it examines gender inequality through the eyes of a ten-year-old Obayda (Obayd as a boy) and what girls can achieve when they get the same rights and freedom as boys. I really felt for Obayda throughout the story, especially her struggles in pretending to be a boy and also coming to terms with what would happen when she returns to being a girl. I also enjoyed reading about her friendship with Rahim. The story is well-written and profoundly perceptive. I liked that the story also focused on friendship, personal growth and family. It’s a compelling and thoughtful read that can also be enjoyed by adult readers.

– NJ