A House Without Windows by Nadia Hashimi

We had the pleasure of meeting internationally renowned author Nadia Hashimi last Spring when she visited Australia!

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The Read3r’s Re-Vu group was very excited to hear about her bestselling novels and engaging in conversation about her journey, writing and how she finds time to write while working as a pediatrician and mother of four!

Nadia’s bestselling books include The Pearl that Broke Its Shell, A House Without Windows, When the Moon is Low and her Young Adult fiction, One Half from the East.

Among Nadia’s bestsellers, Read3rz blogger NJ read A House Without Windows. Check out her blog thoughts below.


“Time passes differently through a woman’s body. We are haunted by all the hours of yesterday and teased by a few moments of tomorrow. That is how we live – torn between what has already happened and what is yet to come.” – Nadia Hashimi, A House Without Windows

This book is more than just another story about Afganistan, it’s a story about women – women who helped each other in the most abysmal of circumstances, women who are resilient, intelligent, brave and powerful during times of struggle and fear, living in a strict society with little to no societal status and rights. A House Without Windows is an empowering read that tugs your heart strings. The story starts with Zeba’s husband, who was brutally murdered in their family home. Zeba was imprisoned for his murder despite the lack of witness and evidence. In order to defend her and save her from death row, Zeba’s lawyer Yusuf must find out what really happened. He must also navigate the convoluted, arbitrary methodologies of Afganistan’s legal system. After reading this novel, I must say that I’m still extremely shocked by the truth of the murder! What I really loved about this book is the interplay between themes of truth and morality, faith and law, honour and justice, society and family, magic and hope from the eyes of the characters. Reading these contrasting themes is like watching a riveting dance, it just makes you want to read on. I also loved the thoughtful writing and complex characters, from the powerful Gulnaz, a loving mother but bewitching trickster, to the Mullah with a hidden past; the characters are compelling and raw. I enjoyed reading about the prison sisterhood too, their stories made me feel so grateful to be living in a society where women have rights. I highly recommend this book for readers who enjoyed A Thousand Splendid Suns or To Kill a Mocking Bird. This story is well written, thought-provoking and heartfelt, leaving the reader with much to think about after the last page.

– NJ

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Eon by Alison Goodman

“I found power in accepting the truth of who I am. It may not be a truth that others can accept but I cannot live any other way.” – Lady Dela in Eon

5 stars!

Sensational, epic writing and an unforgettable story about a heroine with a desperate secret…

I thoroughly enjoyed reading Eon, it’s filled with political intrigue, plot gripping action and a deeper, darker story than I expected. To become a Dragon apprentice, Eon must win the annual dragon contest to prove her worth against other candidates in hopes of being chosen by the elusive and mysterious Rat Dragon and to commune with its power; problem is, Eon is a girl disguised as a boy (women aren’t meant to see dragons)…

What I really liked about this book is the exploration of diversity – in particular the diversity of characters such as Lady Dela, Eon, Ryko and Chart, which is rare in fantasy YA novels. Even though our main character has a physical disability, I liked how her strength is represented in other ways such as her capabilities, inner strength, courage and compassion. I also liked how Lady Dela is man dressed as a woman which directly contrasts with Eon who is a girl pretending to be a boy, and showing how such differences are celebrated in one culture but dangerous in another; the contrast between living authentically and living in a lie. Eon for me is a story about identity, of being truthful to oneself, of friendship, loyalty, compassion and courage to overcome adversity and betrayal. I also enjoyed reading about dragons with powers that can shift monsoons, magical world building that’s inspired by myth and legends of Ancient China. I loved the imagination and the fast paced plot which kept me reading through the night. I highly recommend this great read! This is a YA novel that can also be enjoyed by adults. I want to thank author Alison Goodman for coming to our exclusive high tea and telling us about Eon and Eona. I’m proud to have the duology as part of my book collection.

Other intriguing quotes from the book:

“‘And what do you say Lord Eon? Does the acceptance of foreigners into our land dilute our magnificent culture?’…I groped for the only thing I had: experience. ‘I like the coffee that Ari the Foreigner sells in the market, Your Majesty…I do not know about diluting our culture. It is just a drink and he is just a man who sells it.’”

‘“I do not wear men’s clothing because I am a woman in here,’ she touched her head, ‘and there,’ she touched her heart. ‘You are wrong when you say there is no power in being a woman. When I think of my mother and the women in my tribe, and even the hidden women in the harem. I know there are many types of power in this world.’ She turned around to face me. ‘I found power is in accepting the truth of who I am. It may not be a truth that others can accept but I cannot live any other way. How would it be to live a lie every minute of your life? I don’t think I could do it.

– NJ

Click here to read the book blurb on Goodreads